20 Tips for Successful Tweeting!


1. Regularly Re-Tweet other Etsy sellers tweets


2. Un-follow anyone who hasn't followed you back within a week


3. Follow 50 new people per week

4. Find your target customers by finding someone else who sells what you sell and follow all of their followers. i.e.: If you sell pet products, go to @petco or @petsmart and follow all of their followers

5. Always respond to your @replies and Direct Messages

6. Don't only tweet about your Etsy shop-engage in conversations with others too

7. Don't attack people for what you perceive to be spam, that's tacky. Just un-follow anyone who is spamming you

8. Don't talk about politics or religion if you use Twitter for your business. You might alienate a potential customer

9. Don't send automated Direct Messages. I have about 1000 ADM's that all say the same thing. No one likes it and it doesn't work.

10. Click on other Etsy seller's tweeted links and comment on the items or blogs they are promoting.

11. Bring up a favorite TV show, book, or event and ask who else is a fan. I've met some really cool people this way!

12. Promote someone else's shop. Include their twitter name in the tweet so they know you tweeted them. It's always a nice surprise!

13. Participate in #Follow Friday and #WoofWednesday

14. Use those "share" buttons on people's blogs to share their posts on Twitter

15. Don't offer to help people get "15,000 new followers in a week". Seriously.....

16. Don't take "what are you doing" so literally all the time.

17. Look for people asking for help and offer to help them

18. Tweet all your new blog posts and Etsy items at least once

19. Behave like a business person. Don't be crude or offensive or use tweets to rant about a personal problem if you are promoting your business.

20. Just be a decent human being and treat others as you would like to be treated...it's the golden rule after all!





10 comments:

  1. all great tips! I'm still trying to get the retweet thing down pat, and great point about droppig folks who don't follow. I am even selective about what requests I follow, if it's offensive to me, can't help my business.

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  2. great tips. I would add one "don't": don't spam about your etsy shop. i see sellers that twit their shop imventory 5 times per hour . it's annoying.

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  3. Wow! Really good advice here! I'm probably the worst tweeter ever :O) Time to get a bit better... thanks for sharing!!!

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  4. Good tweet tips! :-) Today I just discovered a tweet app called Tweepular. Have you ever used it? I just removed all of the unfollowers from my account using Tweepular.

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  5. All great tips. I love the idea of following all the followers of someeone who sells what you make. I'll have to check on that. And I love helping other sellers. I blog about a different Etsy shop every monday and like to tweet about it so others will see their shops.
    http://KayzKreationz.blogspot.com
    http://KayzKreationz.etsy.com
    http://twitter.com/KayzKreationz

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  6. Great tips! Thanks for the very helpful article. I'm new to Twitter & have done at least one of these things (on someone's advice) before realizing how annoying it is for me to see some of the bad habits from people I have followed. Thanks again!
    P.S. I have retweeted some of your very useful articles to my followers.

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  7. Thank you for such a great post, I wondered how all of those people got so many following them.

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  8. Hi,

    I don't agree with number 2.
    I may follow a person who tweets interesting stuff or is the author of an interesting blog and my content may not be of interest to that person ( and vice-versa).

    Best regards,

    José

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  9. You give alot of good advice. I have been in customer service for a long time and know your tips to be true. But it is nice to be reminded. This old brain had forgotten at least half of them.

    But I especially like the "be polite to others". As business people we need to remember that what we say and do determines how we are perceived.

    Cheryl

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